Passover Pancakes/Waffles

This recipe comes right out of my book, Passover – A Kosher Collection, but I’ve always made them as pancakes. This week, in my Passover Facebook group a member asked if anybody had a waffle recipe and I thought I’d try my pancake recipe as a waffle. It was great! It doesn’t get quite as crispy as my typical waffle mix, but the edges were nice and crispy and the waffles were tender and delicious.

These are great with butter and syrup, but even better with strawberry or mixed berry sauce (see Strawberry Sauce at the bottom of my Cheese Blintz post). Use this batter for waffles or pancakes, as-is or add blueberries or chocolate chips or any other additions you like in yours.

Ingredients

  • 135 grams/ 4 3/4 oz cake meal (1 cup)
  • 2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 Tbsp. melted butter
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 1 1/4 cup 2% milk

Use a whisk to combine the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. In another bowl, whisk the wet ingredients together.

Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients in. Use a spoon to combine, mixing until it all comes together and there are no lumps. Let there mixture rest for 5 minutes.

If you’re making waffles, follow the directions of your waffle maker. Using approximately 1/2 cup of batter per waffle, the recipe makes 6 waffles.

For pancakes: Place a large non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Spray/ brush the pan with oil and pour in as much batter as you like. Using a 1/4 cup per pancake will make approximately 12 pancakes.

Cook the pancake until the edges start to brown and there are lots of little bubbles on there surface, 1-2 minutes. Use a spatula to flip them over and cook until the second studded is golden brown.

Serve immediately or keep in a warm oven until they are all cooked. Serve with butter, syrup, fresh berries or berry sauce.

3 comments

    • Cake meal is finely ground matzah – it’s ground to resemble flour. For Passover we can’t use flour in its raw form, so matzo (just flour and water baked together under specific technique and time restraints) is ground up into 2 textures:
      Matzo meal, resembles breadcrumbs
      Cake meal, resembles flour

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